User Stories are not requirements

User Stories are not requirements

I always struggle with the word “requirements”. This is how specifications and functionalities are normally called when working on a project. Requirements create a blanket of necessity and limit the empowerment of product managers to be effective at solving problems. The word requirement, and its verb counterpart to require, in their essence define something that is “required”, “needed”, “expected”. The

The Product Manager’s reading list

Books Books on Agile, Product, Design Thinking, Innovation to fill your library and grow your expertise: Product Management “Inspired: How to Create Tech Products Customers Love”, by Marty Cagan “Deliver Great Products that Customers Love”, by Valerio Zanini Agile “Scrum Mastery: From Good to Great Servant-Leadership”, Geoff Watts Product planning and MVPs “User Story Mapping: Discover the Whole Story, Build

If Agile fails, blame Product management

Agile planning

Solid Product management and discovery practices are at the foundation of any product development effort. I often find that when Agile fails, it’s not because “Agile”​ doesn’t work. It’s because the organization has not taken the rights steps to foster a product development mindset. Here I share a few tips on how to support Product and Agile transformations.

Use the 5D Canvas to plan your product across the 5 Dimensions of great products

Use the 5D Canvas to plan your product across the 5 Dimensions of great products

Once you have a Product Vision and an initial understanding of the customer needs and the opportunity, it’s a good time to look ahead across all 5 Dimensions of great products and begin thinking about the activities to do at each stage of the product development process. As we discussed in several occasions, there is a risk in approaching the

The 3 pillars of great products

The 3 pillars of great products

I have worked in a variety of organizations across different industries, helping my teams or my clients build successful products. From Cisco to Capital One, from my startup Goozex.com to clients I have advised, from private organizations to the military, I have found three common elements that successful teams must have to deliver great products. These elements are the three

Closing the Delivery gap

Closing the Delivery gap

We have become increasingly good at building products. Agile, DevOps, Lean Startup methodologies have reduced the time to market and the complexity of deploying a new set of features, while improving the quality and shortening the feedback loop with customers. Armed with these methodologies, product managers can ideate, design and build products in shorter times, deploy them in the marketplace,

Using Buy-A-Feature to rank customer value on a set of features

Using Buy-A-Feature to rank customer value on a set of features

Buy-A-Feature is a great tool to source interest from your end-users about a set of features, and understand how they make trade-offs between them. It’s effective at providing a high-level prioritization based on your customers’ preferences, perceived value, and expectations. There are many versions of this tool, and many ways it can be used. This method can be used to